How the Trans Movement Hurts Victims of Sexual Assault

News & Politics

Remember when the radical left was trying to convince us that “rape culture” was a thing in the United States? It wasn’t all that long ago. Though the theory originated in the 1970s, the #MeToo movement really brought it back into the public consciousness for a while.

“Rape culture pressures women to sacrifice their freedoms and opportunities in order to stay safe, because it puts the burden of safety on women’s shoulders, and blames them when they don’t succeed,” explained Amanda Taub at Vox in 2014. “As a result, certain opportunities are left unavailable to women.”

Everyone agrees that rape is wrong, and that transcends politics. But regardless of whether you believe in the rape culture theory or not, one thing is undeniable: the radical transgender movement is contributing to it.

The trans movement sought to cancel famed Harry Potter author J.K. Rowling. For what? Defending the rights of women, such as when she criticized Scottish police for allowing male rapists who “identify” as women to be housed with female inmates.

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Imagine being so brainwashed by the trans movement that you’d be okay with a male rapist being incarcerated with female inmates. Is that not enabling a rapist?

When a ninth-grade girl was raped in the girls’ restroom in Virginia’s Loudoun County last May, the school board actively tried to cover it up. The school did not report the assault to the police, choosing instead to handle the case in-house. Why? Because the assault was committed by a gender-fluid boy wearing a skirt. The girl’s father, Scott Smith, was furious, and the school called the police on him for “making a scene” over it.

Smith later told his daughter’s story during a Loudoun County School Board meeting to protest their plan to implement pro-transgender policies. But the school claimed to have no record of the assault, and a local leftist activist who also attended the meeting told Smith she didn’t believe his daughter’s story.

So much for believing victims, right?

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It is a well-known fact that the vast majority of sexual assaults are committed by men. Yet, the moment a male rapist claims to identify as female or nonbinary, any skepticism is immediately dubbed transphobic. One could argue that the transgender movement is protecting rapists by denying their status as males.

Ezra Miller, who plays The Flash in the DC Extended Universe, has been accused of child trafficking and sexual abuse of a minor. Miller identifies as non-binary, so the media, apparently unwilling to acknowledge these crimes were perpetrated by a man, went to extraordinary lengths not to “misgender” him in its reporting. Variety even altered testimony from one of his victims, replacing male pronouns with they/them.

This is happening all over, not just in America. Last month, the British Broadcasting Corporation (BBC) changed a rape victim’s statement. The BBC was concerned about backlash if they published the victim’s testimony verbatim, because she “misgendered” her rapist by using male pronouns.

If rape culture exists, then the transgender movement is perpetuating it by giving deference to rapists and abusers who identify as women or non-binary and pretend they aren’t, in fact, men. This causes women who were raped to be afraid to speak out over potential backlash from the LGBT community. The transgender movement would rather force women—real women—to feel unsafe than admit that a male rapist is, in fact, male.

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