How Did CBS Celebrate Earth Day? Declaring Humans Aren’t Needed

News & Politics

How did CBS Evening News celebrate Earth Day? By sharing the ugly sentiment that humans were not needed. That’s exactly what reporter John Blackstone suggested in his Wednesday report touting how the deadly Chinese coronavirus, which had killed more than 47,000 Americans and left 22 million unemployed, was keeping the country stuck inside.

“Tonight, we mark the 50th anniversary of Earth day. There were supposed to be big celebrations around the world, but instead, people are celebrating inside and they’re celebrating cleaner air and cleaner water,” boasted anchor Norah O’Donnell as she led into the segment.

Blackstone kicked off his report by marveling at the irony that Earth Day 2020 was marked by staying indoors. “On this Earth Day, the out-of-doors is largely out of bounds. Parks and beaches are closed. Even picnic tables are off-limits,” he gawked.

He then spoke with Michael Brune, the executive director of the Sierra Club, who claimed they expected “hundreds of millions of people out in the streets” celebrating before the virus came along. “In 1970, on the first Earth Day, demonstrators filled cities around the world. Today, those streets are largely empty, but the air, temporarily at least, is cleaner,” Blackstone added.

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Speaking of the founding of Earth Day. Blackstone didn’t mention that Earth Day’s radical leftist co-founder Ira Einhorn had murdered and composted his girlfriend in a trunk in his closet.

Brune would later tell CBS that “We all need nature, a lot more than nature needs us.” That prompted Blackstone to opine about how humans weren’t needed:

BLACKSTONE: Earth Day is dedicated to all species. And while humans are locked down, wildlife’s filling the void. In Yosemite, animals aren’t hiding from visitors. On Florida’s coasts, Manatees are showing up in unusual numbers.

(…)

BLACKSTONE: From goats in a deserted town in Wales, to lions lounging on a road in South Africa; nature seems to be saying, “We can get along fine without you.”

And while the other broadcast networks (ABC and NBC) also noted how a lack of human activity was resulting in less pollution and increased animal activity, none of them took the grotesques stance against their own species that CBS and Blackstone took there.

The transcripts are below, click “expand” to read:

CBS Evening News
April 22, 2020
6:4919 p.m. Eastern

NORAH O’DONNELL: Tonight, we mark the 50th anniversary of Earth day. There were supposed to be big celebrations around the world, but instead, people are celebrating inside and they’re celebrating cleaner air and cleaner water. Here’s CBS’ John Blackstone with tonight’s Eye on Earth.

[Cuts to video]

JOHN BLACKSTONE: On this Earth Day, the out-of-doors is largely out of bounds. Parks and beaches are closed. Even picnic tables are off-limits.

I imagine this is a much different Earth day 50 than you had expected to be.

Michael Brune is executive director of the Sierra Club.

MICHAEL BRUNE: We expected to see hundreds of millions of people out in the streets.

UNIDENTIFIED REPORTER: There were dozens of exhibits.

BLACKSTONE: In 1970, on the first Earth Day, demonstrators filled cities around the world. Today, those streets are largely empty, but the air, temporarily at least, is cleaner.

PAUL SAFFO: There are a whole bunch of people around the world who are seeing blue skies above their cities for the first time.

BLACKSTONE: Technology forecaster Paul Saffo says that may help clear the air in the future.

SAFFO: All of this enforced working at home will have a huge impact. It is completely culturally acceptable to work at home, where even three months people would have winced at that.

BLACKSTONE: Earth Day is dedicated to all species. And while humans are locked down, wildlife’s filling the void. In Yosemite, animals aren’t hiding from visitors. On Florida’s coasts, Manatees are showing up in unusual numbers.

UNIDENTIFIED WOMAN: Right in front of our apartment!

BLACKSTONE: From goats in a deserted town in Wales, to lions lounging on a road in South Africa; nature seems to be saying, “We can get along fine without you.”

BRUNE: We all need nature, a lot more than nature needs us.

BLACKSTONE: Perhaps more than ever, this Earth Day is a reminder of how much there is out there to cherish. John Blackstone, CBS News, San Francisco.

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